Tiny House of the Future: Six Word Sci-Fi Stories

Last year I posted six six-word sci-fi stories. Here’s six more. Feel free to take a crack at it yourself and post the results in the comments. I look forward to seeing them. Continue reading

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Why Children’s Books Matter

This is me and a friend with K. A. Applegate, author of the Animorphs series. Animorphs, Harry Potter, the Julie of the Wolves books, and Harriet the Spy are what made me want to be a writer. So, when K. A. Applegate was scheduled to appear at my local bookstore, my friend and I knew we had to go. What struck me most about actually meeting one of my favorite authors from childhood in the flesh was how she was so encouraging of the kids who liked writing or wanted to be writers and so excited to see her older readers, saying Animorphs fans grew up to be the coolest people. When K. A. Applegate was asking a little girl if she was a writer and encouraging her to be one, I couldn’t help but think how much that would have meant to me as a kid.

K. A. Applegate and J. K. Rowling were my heroes. They filled my shelf and shaped my budding view of the world. Honestly, I still get confused when people say women can’t write sci-fi or military science fiction because K. A. Applegate was the first sci-fi writer I knew. Sure, my first memories are of either the children’s room at my church or my parents watching Star Trek (which explains more about me than you know) and I loved Star Wars, but the first sci-fi books that I really engaged with and enjoyed were the Animorphs books. Continue reading

Writing Prompt: The Talk

With all of the on-screen and off-screen steamy sex scenes, sexual tension, and shipping fodder in the literary world, it’s probably a good thing to know what your character is attracted to and what their romantic/sexual history is. However, fewer writers address what their character knows about sex or how they learned it. Many a YA/children’s book or memoir has been devoted to the awkward stage that is (pre-)puberty and one’s first (attempts at a) sexual encounter, but it seems largely neglected in speculative fiction, save for the occasional body horror story, supernatural transformation/gene/power activation parallel, or anything by Tamora Pierce.

This is especially important in fiction with historical, secondary world, or futuristic settings, as it is a key aspect of life and so a key aspect of worldbuilding. Thus, in the vein of that infamous Hogwarts Sex Ed fanfic and Dr. Tatiana’s Sex Advice to All Creation, I propose writing a scene in which your characters gets The Talk or a talk or otherwise discovers Their Changing Body and what this whole sex thing is about anyway. Continue reading

At Dawn We Ride. Er, Submit.

Well, I did it. I submitted a book. Not The Book but a book. Well, technically a novella, but, if published, it would be in book format. With cover art. And an ISBN number. Book! Book I say! It still feels all weird and new and tingly and nervous-like. But I’ll stop carrying on like a literary Tom Cruise and get down off my couch of bookish novelty. Or novella-ty, as it were. Anyway, here’s the blurb for it. Wish me luck. Continue reading

One Small Sentence for Man, One Giant Leap for Procrastination

The other day, Tor.com posted on Facebook about six word Fantasy/Sci-Fi stories, prompting all manner of creative responses in the comments. I went ahead and tried my hand at it. Here are a few I came up with. I encourage any and all of you to leave your own in the comments. I’d love to see what you come up with. Continue reading

The Invisible Man: speculative fiction and disability

That’s how we roll in sci-fi.

I don’t know if any of you have seen the infographic floating around about representation in science fiction movies or not, but I wanted to talk about an issue I had with it, namely what constitutes a “protagonist with a disability”. I won’t post a link to the infographic here because my intention is not to call it or its creator out. In fact, I applaud them for raising awareness of representation issues. However, I am bothered by the infographic’s problematic take on this specific issue, as well as by this discussion in general (which seems to happen every few years when there is a renewed controversy over Barbara Gordon). Continue reading

Alternate Histories: An Interview with Greg Pak

An interesting discussion on the writer’s responsibility to history in science fiction or alternate history stories. Care to weigh in?

Reviews by Lantern's Light

Greg Pak (pronounced Pock) is an accomplished film director and comic writer with acclaimed runs on The Incredible Hulk, Hercules, and Action Comics, among others. In his ten years as a published comic writer, Pak has written tragedy, comedy, and high drama, he’s shaped the births of some of Marvel’s most dangerous villains, written DC’s flagship title, and even shown the world a gay, gubernatorial Wolverine!

In short, he’s a pretty impressive guy and it’s no surprise that he’s in high demand at the moment. Pak currently writes Superman in DC’s Action Comics and Batman/Superman, a revived Turok: Dinosaur Hunter for Dynamite, and is set to launch the first ever Storm series from Marvel next month.

I managed to talk to Mr. Pak at Special Edition: NYC. As you might guess, he was very busy but he absolutely insisted on giving…

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