A Yule Story

winter-wolves

So, I’ve been a bit delayed in getting this up, but I’m happy to announce that I have another short story out in a new anthology. As some of you may recall from this earlier post, my writer’s block coincided with my laments of a lack of accurate, non-stereotyped, modern depictions of pagans in the media, particularly children’s media. So, I set out to write a story about the kind of pagans I know in real life for the winter-themed third installment in the Wolf Warriors charity anthology series. Thus, “Yuletide Carols” was born. Continue reading

Your daily dose of Salt and Iron

Hello, dear readers. Lately I’ve been posting a lot about my books. While I in no way promise for the shameless self-promotion to stop, I would like to post more things in between. What would you like to see? More writing prompts? More recipes or salty food experiments? More personal essays? More art? More microfiction? What interests you most here on the blog: Continue reading

Hey, Instagram, Bring Back the Goddess

As you may or may not have heard, Instagram has banned the hashtag #Goddess. While this move was allegedly to cut down on explicit content posted under the hashtag, Instagram has inadvertently stepped onto a landmine of sexism, ethnocentrism, religious discrimination, and censorship. Instagram previously tried to ban the hashtag #Curvy for the same reason and reversed the decision after the backlash they faced. Somehow, nobody at Instagram thought that “Goddess”, an arguably way more loaded term than “Curvy”, would have the same issue.

Yet issue there was. Immediately upon noticing the ban, myself and others took to Instagram and other social media platforms to protest. Hashtags like #Goddess, #BringBackTheGoddess, #BringBackGoddess, #GoddessTribe, #GoddessRising, and others took off on both Instagram and Twitter, some with thousands of posts already. There is also a Change.org petition to reverse Instagram’s ban on #Goddess. Articles about the ban can be found on The Mary Sue, The Daily Dot, Bustle, MTV, Seventeen, Daily Mail, eonline, and other sites. Religious news outlets such as The Wild Hunt also covered the issue and religious organizations such as CUUPS (the Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans), The Asatru Community, Wicca Spirituality, and many others have also sounded off on Twitter. People are angry and with good reason. Continue reading

No Gaeilge?

Last year’s St. Patrick’s Day post from my banned books blog is still every bit as relevant.

Bound and Gagged

To be honest, St. Patrick’s Day kind of stresses me out. Between the stereotypes, inaccuracies and downright falsehoods perpetuated about the Irish and the holiday itself, I end up feeling like I’m drowning in a sea of wrong. However, as I am merely an Irish American (and not all Irish at that) and do not speak the language (though I own several books on it in the eternal hope that I will remedy this), I end up feeling like the worst little pseudo-oppressed hipster when I try to correct or complain about anything, even if I have studied Irish history and mythology. And once danced in a Killarney pub with fellow Bound & Gagged banned books blogger, Hannah.

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Poetry Circle: Turn Ambivalence into Empowerment

If my last poem left you hankering for more, you’re in luck. Two of my poems were featured in digital magazine Fabulously Feminist: Art For Eco & Social Justice today. I’m excited to be in Fabulously Feminist and I’m thrilled with how well it turned out. But don’t take my word for it, you can read the whole thing, including poems “I Am of Fire” and “A Willow Weeps for No One”, here. While you’re there, feel free to poke around and check out the rest of Fabulously Feminist’s awesome work. And let me know what you think of my poems.

Forget the “Gritty” Reboots, The Original Grimm is Here (And Far More Terrifying)

This post is from my other blog but seemed worth sharing here too, given the subject matter.

Bound and Gagged

Greetings, readers. First off, I’d like to apologize for neglecting the blog so much recently. Other priorities demanded my attention and I let things get away from me. Anyway, thanks for sticking with me and I’ll be redoubling my efforts to bring you reviews and other banned books news.

To start things off, I bring excellent news for fans of mythology, folktales, fairy tales, German folk culture, and generally scarring children for life. A new translation of the Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales will keep all of the uncensored gory details and the (more) disturbing stories that got left out of the Brother Grimm collection when it was refurbished for children and the then-modern, Christian sensibilities of their parents. So, if you ever wished bedtime stories were more like this, only with more dismemberment and mommy issues, you’re in luck.

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Stone Soup #1: An Inexact Recipe and a Mythology Major Overthinking Soup

Can you cook with all the colors of the farmstand?

Can you cook with all the colors of the farmstand?

If you don’t want to read all of my pseudo-anthropologically-minded ramblings, feel free to scroll down to the actual soup.

A Mythology Major Otherthinking Soup

I grew up in a UU Church where On the Day You Were Born and Stone Soup were childhood staples used in sermons themselves, a shared community mattered much more than a shared creed, and food and fellowship went hand in hand with worship. Holy day rituals were followed by a potluck and a bardic circle. Continue reading