Rainy Day Reads

I knew I shouldn't have let her watch Vikings...

I knew I shouldn’t have let her watch Vikings…

It’s a rainy day here at the beginning of a rainy week, so Pippin is hitting the folktales pretty hard. What do you like to read on a rainy day?

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Mythy Goodness and Folksy Links

Happy Ostara!

Even if it doesn’t look like spring outside, I’ve been doing a little spring cleaning here on the blog. Most notably, I’ve added a Myth/Folk/Fairy Tale Resources section beneath my Blogroll. Through the years, I’ve had a lot of people in my life ask my recommendations for books on mythology, religion, etc, whether for fun, for their own self-taught educational purposes, for research paper sources, or to get more bedtime stories for their kids. Thus, I thought I would extend the same service to the good people who visit my blog, since epic/oral lit, classics, myth/folk, and fairy tales are a large part of what I talk about here, so chances are it interests some of you. Continue reading

Dead Tongues Tell No Tales

This post originally appeared on Bound and Gagged, the banned books blog I run. However, since Irish History Month is upon us, I thought I’d share it here.

Bound and Gagged

IrishReadsToday is St. Patrick’s Day. For many around the world, especially here in America, that means shamrock Mardi Gras beads, pub crawling, and a drunken bacchanalia in the name of one’s Irish heritage. This is largely due to the fact that the Irish, whether because of famine, occupation, or genocide, are a diasporic people with descendants scattered worldwide. However, it is a pet peeve of many how little people claiming Irish heritage know about Ireland, its history, its politics, or its impact on the world. For example, while getting feedback on a story set in Ireland, hardly anyone in my college level writing workshop group knew the difference between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

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