Mythy Goodness and Folksy Links

Happy Ostara!

Even if it doesn’t look like spring outside, I’ve been doing a little spring cleaning here on the blog. Most notably, I’ve added a Myth/Folk/Fairy Tale Resources section beneath my Blogroll. Through the years, I’ve had a lot of people in my life ask my recommendations for books on mythology, religion, etc, whether for fun, for their own self-taught educational purposes, for research paper sources, or to get more bedtime stories for their kids. Thus, I thought I would extend the same service to the good people who visit my blog, since epic/oral lit, classics, myth/folk, and fairy tales are a large part of what I talk about here, so chances are it interests some of you. Continue reading

Poetry Circle: Turn Ambivalence into Empowerment

If my last poem left you hankering for more, you’re in luck. Two of my poems were featured in digital magazine Fabulously Feminist: Art For Eco & Social Justice today. I’m excited to be in Fabulously Feminist and I’m thrilled with how well it turned out. But don’t take my word for it, you can read the whole thing, including poems “I Am of Fire” and “A Willow Weeps for No One”, here. While you’re there, feel free to poke around and check out the rest of Fabulously Feminist’s awesome work. And let me know what you think of my poems.

When A Hero Comes Home

A soldier returns home from battle but has brought the war with him. He stares off into the distance, unable to take joy in his family or friends, still hyperalert to threats he no longer faces. Unable to heal his invisible wound, he takes his own life.

This isn’t a tragic news story about a veteran coming back from Afghanistan with a case of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It’s a summary of the Greek play “Ajax,” which is more than 2,000 years old (“Ancient warrior myths help veterans fight PTSD“).

Since I touched on PTSD in the classics in the last post and it is Memorial Day, it seemed only right to share this article I stumbled upon about how ancient myths, plays, and literary works are helping veterans heal, cope, and transition after coming home from war. I actually studied this at length in school, particularly in several epic literature classes, a class on genocide and reconciliation, a class on Ancient Ireland, and a class on combat trauma and how it relates to Ancient Greek theatre, most of them taught by Professor Robert Meagher of Hampshire College, who specializes in this (among other things). Continue reading

Salt of the Earth

You may be wondering what “salt and iron” means or why health is listed alongside mythology and writing. What does salt have to do with writing? What does health have to do with mythology? Well, a great deal actually. Continue reading

The Girls’ Guide to Horror; Full Interview with Shannon Barnsley

I sat down with writer, blogger, and fellow Hampshire alum Lydia Hadfield to talk about women in horror. You can read the full interview on her blog here. And, if you happen to live in the Brunswick area, quotes from me, local librarians, and local teenagers will appear in her article on the matter for The Brunswick Citizen.