Linky Goodness and Some Good News

As many of you may know, my novella, Beneath Blair Mountain, was published by 1888/Black Hill Press alongside Let’s Stalk Rex Jupiter! and A Stalled Ox as part of the Mariya Suzuki Collection. Over the holidays the collection had its first blog tour, which I wrote two guest posts for. Below are links to all five blog stops. I have also added the two guest posts to the interviews list on my How to Find Me (And My Work) section, along with some good news. Drumroll please… I have a humorous fantasy short in a forthcoming anthology, so stay tuned. Continue reading

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Excitingness!

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The Shannon Barnsley Collection as of December 2015.

Published Author Happy Dance

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Cover art by Mariya Suzuki

Merry met again, my good readers. For those of you following the saga of my Appalachian Urban Fantasy novella, you’ll be happy to know that Beneath Blair Mountain is out! You can find it on Amazon and Goodreads or read more about it on 1888’s website. Continue reading

Fey as Folk: Summer Writing Project 2015

So, as devoted readers may remember, I’m participating in the Summer Writing Project, a collaboration between serial writing venue JukePop, indie publisher Black Hill Press, and 1888center. My novella, Beneath Blair Mountain, is current holding fifth in the rankings, but I could use some love, whether you choose to read, comment, vote, share, or just give me a hearty thumbs up.

Beneath Blair Mountain is a fusion of Urban Fantasy/Horror/Mythic Fiction and Historical Fiction/American Gothic, so there should be something for everyone, whether they like myth, folk culture, rural Appalachia, dark fey, Edwardian period pieces, ghost stories, political and social commentary, Irish gunrunners, or American history. Here’s the description if you’re interested: Continue reading

Routineology: Mythmaking, music, and minimized YouTube clips

2015-06-16 08.18.23This week I was featured on Black Hill Press’s Routineology, which offers glimpses into the writing processes and routine of various authors. If you want to know the method behind my madness or see that adorable Okapi Squishable’s reading list of awesome myth, folk, and fairytale books in a much more legible list format, you can read my Routineology here.

If you’re being noncommittal about clicking the link, here’s a snippet to peak your curiosity: Continue reading

Save Wolves, Read An Awesome Book

WolfWarriors

Cover design by Matt Cowan and Marshall Stevens. Wolf Warriors copyright Thurston Howl Publications.

Great news, internet! The anthology I’m in is out! Wolf Warriors: The National Wolfwatcher Coalition Anthology is a wolf-themed charity anthology to raise money for the National Wolfwatcher Coalition, which seeks to educate people about wolves and their importance, as well as advocating for their preservation. The anthology is chock-full of lupine art, fiction, flashfiction, and essays of all genres, so fantasy fans, nature/animal lovers, literary folks, non-fiction people, art enthusiasts, and all manner of readers can all find something to enjoy.

The anthology also features stories by David Clement-Davies (author of The Sight, Fell, and Fire Bringer) and two-time Hugo Award winner Catherynne M. Valente (author of the Fairyland series)! I’m super stoked to be in an anthology with them and can’t wait til my copy arrives so I can read “Fell’s Dream” and “The Wolves of Brooklyn”. Continue reading

The Biggest Little Birdy Told Me: Author Pam Jones talks magical realism, writing, and the 60s

Also originally posted on the Bound and Gagged Banned Books Blog, this interview I conducted with author and Hampshire alum Pam Jones gets into publishing, self-publishing, being a writing major, and the struggles of marketing a niche genre like magical realism or the in-between length that is the novella.

Bound and Gagged

Hello, readers! Once again, I bring you a post that isn’t about banned books. However, I have a real treat in store today: an interview with author Pam Jones! Her first book, The Biggest Little Bird, was published by Black Hill Press and released in December 2013. You can read my review of it here.

The magical realism novella is hard to describe and fascinating to discuss, so without further ado, I bring you a writer’s thoughts on the amusement park’s place in literature, reinvented histories, writing majors, the murky underbelly of a bygone era, and the rollercoaster ride that is getting a book published.

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