Rainy Day Reads

I knew I shouldn't have let her watch Vikings...

I knew I shouldn’t have let her watch Vikings…

It’s a rainy day here at the beginning of a rainy week, so Pippin is hitting the folktales pretty hard. What do you like to read on a rainy day?

Mythy Goodness and Folksy Links

Happy Ostara!

Even if it doesn’t look like spring outside, I’ve been doing a little spring cleaning here on the blog. Most notably, I’ve added a Myth/Folk/Fairy Tale Resources section beneath my Blogroll. Through the years, I’ve had a lot of people in my life ask my recommendations for books on mythology, religion, etc, whether for fun, for their own self-taught educational purposes, for research paper sources, or to get more bedtime stories for their kids. Thus, I thought I would extend the same service to the good people who visit my blog, since epic/oral lit, classics, myth/folk, and fairy tales are a large part of what I talk about here, so chances are it interests some of you. Continue reading

No War on Christmas, Just a Lot of Canons

I wrote this article last year on the banned books blog and wanted to share it, since it may actually be more relevant here. Half a look at how Christmas traditions change and adapt, this post also includes a list of the books, fairy tales, music, and movies that are part of my Christmas canon. Feel free to share yours in the comments.

Bound and Gagged

As a Mythology & Religion major, I think an awful lot about tradition and ritual; why they change, how they change, and how they are kept alive. And there is no time of year when this is more prevalent than the veritable smorgasbord of winter holidays around this time each year. Here the effects of cultural exchange, cultural diffusion, industrialization, and globalization on tradition and folk culture are clearest. For the anthropologically or historically inclined it’s, well, it’s like Christmas morning.

Yet this time of year is also when tensions over said traditions run highest, if the annual “War on Christmas” tirades, arguments in the media over the ethnic background of Santa Claus, concerns that the mainstream American vision of Santa Claus has eclipsed the German Sinter Klaus (Sinterklaas?), many an article on interfaith or Jewish parenting websites regarding the Christmas tree or Channukkah bush, and my Facebook feed are anything to go by. Having given…

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Forget the “Gritty” Reboots, The Original Grimm is Here (And Far More Terrifying)

This post is from my other blog but seemed worth sharing here too, given the subject matter.

Bound and Gagged

Greetings, readers. First off, I’d like to apologize for neglecting the blog so much recently. Other priorities demanded my attention and I let things get away from me. Anyway, thanks for sticking with me and I’ll be redoubling my efforts to bring you reviews and other banned books news.

To start things off, I bring excellent news for fans of mythology, folktales, fairy tales, German folk culture, and generally scarring children for life. A new translation of the Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales will keep all of the uncensored gory details and the (more) disturbing stories that got left out of the Brother Grimm collection when it was refurbished for children and the then-modern, Christian sensibilities of their parents. So, if you ever wished bedtime stories were more like this, only with more dismemberment and mommy issues, you’re in luck.

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Stone Soup #1: An Inexact Recipe and a Mythology Major Overthinking Soup

Can you cook with all the colors of the farmstand?

Can you cook with all the colors of the farmstand?

If you don’t want to read all of my pseudo-anthropologically-minded ramblings, feel free to scroll down to the actual soup.

A Mythology Major Otherthinking Soup

I grew up in a UU Church where On the Day You Were Born and Stone Soup were childhood staples used in sermons themselves, a shared community mattered much more than a shared creed, and food and fellowship went hand in hand with worship. Holy day rituals were followed by a potluck and a bardic circle. Continue reading